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Eight unique (and amusing) rail and metro posters from around the world.

Posted on Nov 24, 2017

Toronto Nail clip.jpgLaughter, it’s said, is often the best policy. Rail and metro operators across the world certainly seem to think so, and many of their public information posters take a light-hearted outlook when dealing with difficult-to-handle subjects – whether alerting passengers to danger or encouraging better behaviour.

Another approach being used by operators that is no less effective is to embarrass those passengers whom from time to time engage in some of the more unwelcome habits that fellow travellers have to endure. For this week’s Friday feature, SmartRail World is presenting eight examples using both strategies from metro rail operators around the world, as they attempt to improve behaviour on their networks.

The first poster above comes from a series of adverts launched by New York’s transport authority, Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), as it attempts to put an end to those passengers choosing to carry out their grooming routines on the carriage instead of at home.

Queensland

Queensland.jpgThe victim of some pretty close-to-the-bone immitations (someone even set up a website that enabled users to add their own messages), this Queensland rail poster attempted to foster good train etiquette by literally following a few simple steps.

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Ireland

Irish Rail.jpg
Ireland's version of its student rail card, the country's national rail operator, 
Iarnród Éireann, created a number of amusing versions of an advert that implored undergraduates to make the trip back home… before they get an unsolicited visit.
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Melbourne

Melbourne.jpg
The skilled animator and illustrator, Patrick Baron, created a campaign across proint and digital for the Australian city famed for its culture, Mebourne. In them, various characters were subjected to pretty horrible demises that served as a warning to the potential dangers of rail travel.
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London

TfL horse.jpgProduced for London 2012, Transport for London rolled out an eclectic range of posters that were displayed across its network of trains, buses, trams and ferries to warn passengers about the increased congestion during the city's Olympics.
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Tokyo

Japan 1.jpgLovers of a cartoon, Japan's capital printed five eye-catching posters that tried to tackle a range of problems on its network, from asking passengers to turn down their earphones, to preventing injuries that can be caused by rushing.
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Pennsylvania

Dude_Phrase2_217x184-Trains.jpgContinuing the theme of consideration for fellow passengers, the Pennsylvanian transport authority, Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority, launched a campaign that also asked for quieter earphones, but also added better eating habits and picking up rubbish into the mix.
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Toronto

TTC Social campaign.jpg
Finishing up in Toronto in Canada, the city has used modern-day technology to communicate some of the many grievances from its passengers. Using real Twitter posts,
Toronto Transit Commission highlighted two in this advert: feets on seats and bad music choices.
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If we missed any, do get in contact. We'd welcome suggestions for some other adverts that caught your attention.


These stories from SmartRail World may also interest you…

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New York riders will see a "complete overhaul" to their subway in coming months.

5 minutes with… Andy Byford, Chief Executive Officer, Toronto Transit Commission.

Japan edges China to secure lead role in India’s high-speed future.


 

Topics: quirky, Passenger Information Systems

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